Today's Gospel in Art - Zacchaeus encounters Christ


Zacchaeus and Christ, Unknown writer, Stammheim Missal,  circa 1170, © The J Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles,

Zacchaeus and Christ, Unknown writer, Stammheim Missal, circa 1170, © The J Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles,

Gospel of 19th November 2019 - Luke 19:1-10

Jesus entered Jericho and was going through the town when a man whose name was Zacchaeus made his appearance: he was one of the senior tax collectors and a wealthy man. He was anxious to see what kind of man Jesus was, but he was too short and could not see him for the crowd. So he ran ahead and climbed a sycamore tree to catch a glimpse of Jesus who was to pass that way. When Jesus reached the spot he looked up and spoke to him: 'Zacchaeus, come down. Hurry, because I must stay at your house today.' And he hurried down and welcomed him joyfully. They all complained when they saw what was happening. 'He has gone to stay at a sinner's house' they said. But Zacchaeus stood his ground and said to the Lord, 'Look, sir, I am going to give half my property to the poor, and if I have cheated anybody I will pay him back four times the amount.' And Jesus said to him, 'Today salvation has come to this house, because this man too is a son of Abraham; for the Son of Man has come to seek out and save what was lost.'

Reflection on the German Illuminated Manuscript

The story of Zacchaeus is so pertinent to our times today. Zacchaeus was intrigued about Jesus and wanted to see for himself who Jesus was by looking at Him from a safe position in the tree. Intrigued, BUT keeping Christ at a distance. How on earth can we get to know anyone, by keeping a distance.... To read on see: www.christianart.today/daily-gospel-reading/239


Tags: Christian Art Today, Patrick van der Vorst, Zacchaeus

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