Newman University to host lecture on Catholic schools and the poor


Newman University in Birmingham is set to host a lecture from Professor Stephen J McKinney as part of its Newman Institute for Leadership in Education (NILE) Series. The lecture will examine the idea of 'the option for the poor' and its relationship to the mission of Catholic schools.

The session will explore the theological option for the poor and how this has been adopted by Catholic schools, drawing on original research into how the option for the poor has been manifested in Catholic schools.

Professor McKinney, who is the leader of the research and teaching group, Creativity, Culture and Faith at the University of Glasgow, said: "This challenging research highlights the fundamental importance of the role of leadership in Catholic schools in addressing the option for the poor and the profound implications of not exercising this option.

"The lecture will provide an opportunity to reflect on and discuss some aspects of the role of the leader in the Catholic school."

Professor McKinney's research interests include Catholic education, faith education, sectarianism and education, the impact of poverty on education and the education of minorities.

He has authored and co-authored more than 120 articles, book chapters, research reports and briefings and is currently the President of the Scottish Educational Research Association.

Newman University has appointed Professor McKinney as Visiting Professor in Catholic Education.

The lecture, 'How can Catholic schools exercise the option for the poor in the UK in the 21st Century', will take place on Wednesday 12 July from 4.30pm at Newman University.

Attendance is free. To secure a place please visit http://estore.newman.co. uk or email shool-education@newman. ac.uk.


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