Yemen: CAAT says UK is complicit in humanitarian catastrophe


The ongoing war in Yemen has reached an even more deadly stage, as the Saudi-led coalition began strikes against the port town of Hodeidah on Monday. Aid agencies and international organisations have warned that thousands of people will be killed in the strikes. The UK has licensed over £4.6 billion worth of arms to Saudi forces since the bombing of Yemen began in March 2015.

The town includes the biggest port in Yemen, and has provided a vital lifeline for many across the country, with over 70% of Yemen's imports, food and aid shipments flowing through it.

Humanitarian organisations have warned that strikes would be devastating. Save the Children said that vital aid will be cut-off and a further 340,000 people could be displaced.

Since the bombing of Yemen began in March 2015, the UK has licensed £4.6 billion worth of arms to the Saudi regime, including:
£2.7 billion worth of ML10 licences (Aircraft, helicopters, drones); £1.9 billion worth of ML4 licences (Grenades, bombs, missiles, countermeasures). It has also licensed substantial amounts of weaponry to the United Arab Emirates and the other regimes taking part in the ongoing bombing campaign.

Andrew Smith of Campaign Against Arms Trade said: "The crisis in Yemen is one of the worst in the world, and almost every major aid agency and international organisation has warned that these strikes will make the situation even more dire.

"There is no doubt that UK arms will play a central role in the bombardment. This terrible war could not have been fought without the complicity of politicians like Theresa May and her colleagues, who have armed and supported the Saudi-led coalition every step of the way."

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