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Saturday, December 10, 2016
Caritas: Poznan climate change talks have made no progress
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 The Poznan talks have made no progress on deciding new global curbs on greenhouse gas pollution, which scientists say are needed to avoid catastrophic climate change - Caritas has said in a statement. UN talks on climate change in Poznan, Poland have ended with very few clear plans for helping poor countries pay to cope with the effects of climate change or cutting global warming.

Caritas is calling on its supporters from around the world to put pressure on their own governments to negotiate throughout 2009 a socially just post 2012 climate agreement.

The UN Climate Change Conference concluded its 14th session with a clear commitment for governments to start in 2009 the negotiation process in order to define an effective response to the adverse effects of climate change. The first draft of the negotiating text should be available by June 2009.
Caritas Internationalis International Delegate Floriana Polito was at Poznan for the launch of the Caritas supported Grow Climate Justice campaign. She said, "We saw another set of climate talks slip by with no new deal on global warming. Although we were never expected a significant breakthrough, we were expecting more ambition and urgency.

"Poznan is the starting point for a global deal to be settled in Copenhagen at the end of 2009. Much work needs to be done if we are to get the deal that millions of people want to ensure a future for their children and cope with devastating impact of climate change."
The main outcome at Poznan was the launch of the Adaptation Fund Board. The fund will release financing to developing countries over the next few months for adaptation programmes to climate change. However, there was no scaling up of finance and, with approximately $60m available, the fund at present is felt to be woefully inadequate.

The Poznan talks have made no progress on deciding new global curbs on greenhouse gas pollution, which scientists say are needed to avoid catastrophic climate change.

Developing countries did show a welcome willingness to negotiate at Poznan, but rich countries sent out weak signals with a lack of commitment from Canada, Australia, the US, Russia and Japan and a compromise deal from the EU.

The Caritas campaign is calling for an international agreement to include support for developing countries to help them adapt to the impacts of climate change and at least a 30-40 % cut in greenhouse gas emissions by industrialised countries by 2020.
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Tags: greenhouse gas pollution, Poznan talks


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