Independent Catholic News logo Welcome Visitor
Saturday, October 1, 2016
Glasgow college begins 150th anniversary celebrations
Comment Email Print
 
St Aloysius' College in Glasgow has begun a year of celebrations in honour of its 150th anniversary with Mass in St Aloysius' Church.  The principal celebrant was the Right Reverend Peter Moran, Bishop of Aberdeen, a former pupil of St Aloysius College.  He was joined by the British Jesuit Provincial, Fr Michael Holman SJ.  The liturgy was attended by many past and present pupils and parents.

During Mass, the College Choir gave the first performance of the anthem 'Serenity' by the world renowned composer, James MacMillan.  This music was composed especially for the anniversary.  The choir was conducted by College Music Director Liam Devlin.

In his homily, Bishop Moran spoke of being a newly ordained priest in 1959 when the college celebrated its centenary and said how pleased he was to play a part in these 150th celebrations.  He remarked that St Aloysius only lived to the age of 23 but managed to attain a life of sanctity and that holiness is not measured by length of days.

The bishop then went on to speak of the college motto 'I am born for greater things', remarking that a Jesuit education focuses on the human person, the whole person and instils values for life, developing talents to be used for the common good.  The faith of the pupils must be formed by the Gospel values, he said.  The delivery of this education remains a challenge to form men and women in faith.  When the Jesuits came to Glasgow, their aim was to make Jesuit education available to as many as possible, so that young educated Catholics could take their place among their peers in society.

The last ten years have brought much development.  John Stoer, the college's first lay headmaster, was singled out for thanks and congratulations.  And Bishop Moran also paid a poignant tribute to the war dead of the college: young men, who, like St Aloysius, met death when they were still young.  He expressed the grief and pride that the college felt about their supreme sacrifice, and remarked how we should remember those who had died who made the college what it is today.

Bishop Moran went on to stress the need to strive constantly to be better, using the example of the Gonzaga Eagle, which represents the bird that soars: 'This should inspire us to soar even higher in the pursuit of our ideals,' he said.  He prayed that the present pupils of the college would go from strength to strength in their endeavours. 'They face challenges and risks we never had to face,' he told the congregation.  He ended by praying for the future of the college, that the vision of St Ignatius would be realised and that a solidly founded formation would continue to inspire many generations of men and women for others.

St Aloysius' College in Glasgow has begun a year of celebrations in honour of its 150th anniversary with Mass in St Aloysius' Church.  The principal celebrant was the Right Reverend Peter Moran, Bishop of Aberdeen, a former pupil of St Aloysius College.  He was joined by the British Jesuit Provincial, Fr Michael Holman SJ.  The liturgy was attended by many past and present pupils and parents.

During Mass, the College Choir gave the first performance of the anthem 'Serenity' by the world renowned composer, James MacMillan.  This music was composed especially for the anniversary.  The choir was conducted by College Music Director Liam Devlin.

In his homily, Bishop Moran spoke of being a newly ordained priest in 1959 when the college celebrated its centenary and said how pleased he was to play a part in these 150th celebrations.  He remarked that St Aloysius only lived to the age of 23 but managed to attain a life of sanctity and that holiness is not measured by length of days.

The bishop then went on to speak of the college motto 'I am born for greater things', remarking that a Jesuit education focuses on the human person, the whole person and instils values for life, developing talents to be used for the common good.  The faith of the pupils must be formed by the Gospel values, he said.  The delivery of this education remains a challenge to form men and women in faith.  When the Jesuits came to Glasgow, their aim was to make Jesuit education available to as many as possible, so that young educated Catholics could take their place among their peers in society.

The last ten years have brought much development.  John Stoer, the college's first lay headmaster, was singled out for thanks and congratulations.  And Bishop Moran also paid a poignant tribute to the war dead of the college: young men, who, like St Aloysius, met death when they were still young.  He expressed the grief and pride that the college felt about their supreme sacrifice, and remarked how we should remember those who had died who made the college what it is today.

Bishop Moran went on to stress the need to strive constantly to be better, using the example of the Gonzaga Eagle, which represents the bird that soars: 'This should inspire us to soar even higher in the pursuit of our ideals,' he said.  He prayed that the present pupils of the college would go from strength to strength in their endeavours. 'They face challenges and risks we never had to face,' he told the congregation.  He ended by praying for the future of the college, that the vision of St Ignatius would be realised and that a solidly founded formation would continue to inspire many generations of men and women for others.

In his address to the congregation, Fr Holman thanked Bishop Moran for celebrating the Mass and expressed his gratitude to the college and former pupils throughout the world for the contributions they have made to the many Jesuit apostolates in the work of the Society of Jesus. He also presented former teacher and Alumni Director, John McCabe, with the Campion Medal, which is given by the British Province of the Society of Jesus to those who have shown dedication and commitment to the Ignatian principles of giving glory to God and serving the common good. In making the award, the Provincial said: "John's entire professional life has been dedicated to the College, to its students, his colleagues and the Aloysian Association of which he is currently president."



Share:  Bookmark and Share
Tags: Bishop of Aberdeen, Fr Michael Holman SJ, Glasgow150th anniversary. Right Reverend Peter Moran, St Aloysius' College


Powered by Bondware
News Publishing Software

The browser you are using is outdated!

You may not be getting all you can out of your browsing experience
and may be open to security risks!

Consider upgrading to the latest version of your browser or choose on below: