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Saturday, October 1, 2016
11 November - a celebration of peace or warfare?
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 November 11 was  a legal holiday commemorating the return to peace on November 11 at 11am when the armistice that ended World War I took effect on that day at that time in 1918. It was declared a legal holiday with these words:

Whereas the 11th of November 1918, marked the cessation of the most destructive and far reaching war in human annals and the resumption by the people of the United States of peaceful relations with other nations, which we hope may never again be severed, and whereas it is fitting that the recurring anniversary of this date should be commemorated with thanksgiving and prayer and exercises designed to perpetuate peace through good will and mutual understanding between nations; etc.

An armistice is an agreement made by opposing sides in a war to stop fighting. It is derived from the Latin armistitium, which is composed of arma, 'arms' and stitium, 'stoppage.' In 1954 the US Congress officially abolish Armistice Day in the US as Armistice Day and replaced it with Veterans Day. That put an end to it as a day of "thanksgiving and prayer and exercises designed to perpetuate peace through good will and mutual understanding between nations." It turned  it into a military recruiting tool for future wars.

Instead of celebrating and remembering the end of war "and the resumption by the people of the United States of peaceful relations with other nations, which we hope may never again be severed,"  Congress put in its place a jingoistic celebration honouring, ennobling and glorifying human beings who went forth to slaughter and maim other human beings and who in turn were themselves slaughtered and maimed by similarly brainwashed human beings.

So we no longer celebrate an end to war and to "perpetuating peace through good will and mutual understanding" on November 11. Instead we celebrate the orchestration of the personal aggrandizement and the self righteousness of old men (veteran is derived from the Latin vetus, old), and in the process the indoctrination of young men and women into the illusionary nobility and glories of creating and walking into hell on earth, war, when the local elites and their charlatan politicians say,"kill."

The Churches' support system for this is the utter misused, indeed abuse, of the person and Feast of St Martin on November 11.

St. Martin was born a pagan and named after Mars. As the story goes: While Martin was a soldier he experienced a vision that became the most-repeated story about his life. He was at the gates of a city  with his soldiers when he met a scantily dressed beggar  Out of compassion he impulsively gave his military cloak to the  beggar. That night Martin
dreamed of Jesus wearing the half-cloak he had given away. He heard Jesus say to the angels: "Here is Martin, the Roman soldier who is not baptized; he has clad me."

The dream confirmed Martin in his piety and he was baptized. He served in the military for another two years until, just before the battle with the Gauls at Worms in 336, Martin determined that his faith prohibited him from fighting, saying, "I am a soldier of Christ. I cannot fight." He was charged with cowardice and jailed, but in response to the charge, he volunteered to go unarmed to the front of the troops. His superiors planned to take him up on the offer, but before they could, the invaders sued for peace, the battle never occurred, and Martin was released from military service.

Yet today the Church has officially and operationally made St Martin into the patron of Christian soldiers who will and do kill.

He should be place before Christian and the world as an example, a symbol, a metaphor for what the world is in drastic need of—taking from military and from those who make fortunes from producing instruments of human destruction—that is, from the most profitable and big business on the planet—and giving that wealth of mind, time and money to clothing the naked , feeding the hungry, relieving pain, etc.

But I suppose a St Martin medal around the neck of a Christian going into battle to kill and maim other human beings sells better in the Christian religious article store, as well as from the pulpit than the Gospel truth about St Martin.

Fr Emmanuel Charles McCarthy

Yours in Christ

Onyinye & Chidi

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Tags: armistice, November 11


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