Independent Catholic News logo Welcome Visitor
Sunday, September 25, 2016
Bishops regret release of draft Missal text
Comment Email Print
┬áBishop Mark JabalÚ, Chairman of the Department for Christian Life and Worship, issued the following statement today, in response to the publication by the Tablet of ICEL's first draft translation of the Ordo Missae. The Department for Christian Life and Worship is disappointed that the Tablet has chosen to publish a confidential draft translation of the Order of Mass. The confidentiality of the consultative process with such texts is intended to help Bishops consider the matters away from a spirit of controversy fuelled by speculation in the Catholic and secular press; any attempt to cloud this process is therefore to be deplored. In preparing for their plenary meeting the Bishops consulted widely amongst their diocesan advisers, both clerical and lay. The Bishops' Conference's Department for Christian Life and Worship, which coordinated the consultation, also ensured that there was proper consultation with the Conference's Consultative Bodies, including the National Board of Catholic Women, the National Conference of Priests, the Conference of Religious and the National Council for Lay Associations. Care was taken that the voices of women and men, lay people, religious, and ordained ministers were heard and listened to. It is to be regretted that by the publication of this text at this stage in the Tablet, its readers will be considering a first draft that has been recognised as only a first draft. The Bishops' Conference issued a press statement advising of its comments and requests to ICEL concerning the preparation of a second draft. ICEL have already begun to revise the translation in response to the observations passed to it by the Bishops' Conference of England and Wales and other English Speaking Conferences around the world. That revision will be considered by the Bishops in due course. It is not known from what source the Tablet has received its copy of the confidential text. It would be a pity if it was obtained as a result of a breach of trust on the part of any of those consulted by the Bishops' Conference of England and Wales. In response, the Tablet's editor Catherine Pepinster wrote: The decision to publish the draft in our 22 May issue was not lightly taken. The future of our Mass is a matter which concerns all English-speaking Catholics. It is important that they see a translation which has caused alarm among experienced liturgists and experts. Bishop JabalÚ, head of the bishops' Department for Christian Life and Worship, regretted on Monday that The Tablet had interfered with the consultative process. He said the bishops needed to consider the issue away from a spirit of controversy fuelled by press speculation. But as Bishop JabalÚ goes on to note, the bishops' consultation of diocesan advisers is now complete; the bishops have submitted their suggested amendments to ICEL. As we made clear in our preface to the translation, The Tablet has waited until that process was complete precisely in order not to interfere with it. Bishop JabalÚ says: "care was taken that the voices of men and women, lay people, religious and ordained ministers were heard and listened to". Like Bishop JabalÚ, The Tablet believes that lay Catholics should see the draft. Bishop JabalÚ regrets that "by the publication of this text at this stage in The Tablet, its readers will be considering a first draft that has been recognised as only a first draft". The Tablet has constantly made it clear that this is only a draft, and our readers have been left in no doubt about this. Whether or not it is a "first draft" or a "final draft" is currently in question. Cardinal George Pell, chairman of Vox Clara, has made clear that Rome would like the draft approved in time for use next year. This is why it is right that our readers should see it at this time. Bishop JabalÚ is concerned that the translation may have been obtained as a result of a breach of trust on the part of those consulted by the bishops' conference. The draft translation which The Tablet published was already in the public domain. It was freely available on a website of an Australian public radio station, and the link to that site was circulating widely for at least a month before The Tablet decided to publish the draft. Anyone with an internet search engine could have had sight of it.
Share:  Bookmark and Share
Tags: None


Powered by Bondware
News Publishing Software

The browser you are using is outdated!

You may not be getting all you can out of your browsing experience
and may be open to security risks!

Consider upgrading to the latest version of your browser or choose on below: